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20130125
20130125
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. the consumer is in a worse spot primarily because of tax hikes. supply side economics, right. so apple is a consumer company for the most part and i think that any consumer company will struggle. >> that's an important point. let's follow that point. is part of this apple drop weakness in consumer spending or expected weakness, or is it, in fact, the competition from samsung and the fact that the company is not executing. in other words is it a company story, an economics story, what is it? >> there's a lot of company specific stuff going on just comparables this quarter versus a year ago. that's part of it. it's a maturing company to a degree. it's going through its growth phase. now getting into the phase which hopefully will last a long time you focus on return on invested capital. that could be fine. the market has to adjust to that perception. i think the consumer point is a good one. is the consumer going retrench with higher taxes and we see the jobless claims out the last few weeks -- >> coming down. >> they are looking great. >> is it seasonal or real. we won't know that for a
do we mean just raising taxes? isn't most of the austerity in europe raising taxes? >> no. >> not in greece? >> it would actually be starting to collect taxes. >> we raise taxes, which have to do with the middle class -- >> that's the austerity you're talking about, raising taxes? >> yes. >> and also the cutting of wages. we have a dramatic cut in wages, not only in the public sector, but also in the private sector. because the economy, the basis itself on small and medium enterprises, which mainly produce for the domestic market, this has been a distraction. we have lost a lot of jobs, a lot of company, the private sector in a very bad state, in a country which was growing with a rate of more than 4%. but this double -- >> so much more than you were taking in at that point. there's a deficit that has to be paid off. and the measures you're talking about, technology and organizing the economy could take a long time to kick in. >> this is correct. but the main problem in greece was always state revenues. because they do not tax the rates. they allow tax evasion for the weal
the money that you need toward all of this. and i'd like to get your take on the tax structure that is most favorable to getting people to be as generous as they can. what could you tell our viewers in terms of what government policy may be able to do to actually encourage more giving and how it can hurt? >> well, the tax deductibility of charitable giving certainly has been a positive factor in why the u.s. is the most generous. people give about 2% of their incomes and that's true it's not disproportionately the richest. across the board americans are quite generous. the estate tax which lets your charitable giving not be taxed is clearly a very positive encouragement to look at giving. i'd say that even more than the taxes, though, the fact that there's more examples of people where -- so everyone is asking themselves, you know, could i be giving you something, the fact that they hear the impact is very strong, i think the kind of social movement is even more, but the tax structure helps. >> what continuing investment is needed at this point? in other words who are the biggest stakeholde
in washington? the higher payroll taxes, and the general sense that the economy's not getting any better. is it? the answer's simple. why you may not think the overall economy is getting better, you're missing the big picture, partner. if you were to ask me to game the market using just one figure, one figure only, it wouldn't be what apple earns, the gross domestic product, the growth rate of earnings or the dividend yield of the s&p, it would be the weekly jobless claims. the weekly jobless claims is an indicator of future employment in this country. there's absolutely no coincidence that we had five-year highs today in the stock market. at the same time that unemployment claims hit five-year lows. it isn't fanciful that the market's roaring because jobs are being created at an accelerating pace. it's the most important determinant of the stock market. after all, the market got crushed when unemployment went above 5.5% and soared right into the great recession. i think these positive jobless numbers are occurring because of the certainty that comes from putting a presidential election and a t
, merger which i think could happen with the fortune. and really could. it's not till november that the tax laws allow that to be. i do believe it's going to blow a quarter. i think mtw should split itself up into two separate companies. food, service, and cranes. remember those ice machines when you go out to -- ice machines, you feel like you're getting something for free. it's really water. we also get results from beemus. its tom symbol is bms, which stands for buy my stock. here's the stock i mentioned earlier this week as part of the brand new bull market in packaging of all things. you're going to sey 15id that. i'm expecting a very good quarter after the close. we get the new one, the ipo, barry plastics. the other packaging bull market player. i think there's a lot to like here too. on the lookout for both of these. if buy my stock goes down ahead of when it reports, buy its stock. all right. now, on friday morning i think you're going to see the contrast between the world's largest oil company, exxon, which has truly become a serial disappointer, and chevron, which has become a co
. they've got plenty of room to make a good margin and pay this tax to microsoft for the operating system. i'm not so concerned about apple as much as just the whole market getting commoditized. on the consumer side, i think that's a tough market for microsoft. if you don't need office, you really don't need to pay a premium for your products. they can afford to cut price on their hardware. microsoft's hair wear shipments are material on the market. they're there to show good design. it's important that their partners -- >> you could say they're out of touch. you mentioned office. i see now there's a suggestion that actually when the new office suite comes out, it will be licensed. you will pay a monthly subscription in order to have microsoft office. that doesn't seem to be where the bulk of the market is at the moment. that's not what consumers are doing, generally in their lives, is it? >> actually, simon, 20% of office's consumer, you know, 80% is enterprise, and 60% of enterprises are on subscription already. so there is a pretty significant migration to subscription that's well alon
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6